Sep 21, 2017

This photo was shown on the Ken Burns Vietnam documentary without discussion. This was one of the powerful photos from Vietnam, showing a South Vietnamese General executing a Viet Cong. The back story from Wikapedia below:

General Nguyen Ngoc Loan Executing a Viet Cong Prisoner in Saigon is a photograph taken by Eddie Adams on 1 February 1968. It shows South Vietnamese National Police Chief Nguyễn Ngọc Loan executing a Việt Cộng captain of an insurgent team Nguyễn Văn Lém (referred to as Captain Bảy Lốp), in Saigon during the Tet Offensive.

Around 4:30 A.M., Lém led a sabotage unit along with Viet Cong tanks to attack the Armor Camp in Go Vap. After communist troops took control of the base, Lém arrested Lieutenant Colonel Nguyen Tuan with his family and forced him to show them how to drive tanks.[citation needed] When Lieutenant Colonel Tuan refused to cooperate, Lém killed Tuan, his wife and six children and his 80-year-old mother by cutting their throats. There was only one survivor, a seriously injured 10-year-old boy.[citation needed]

Lém was captured near a mass grave with 34 civilian bodies. Lém admitted that he was proud to carry out his unit leader's order to kill these people.[6] Having personally witnessed the murder of one of his officers along with that man's wife and three small children in cold blood,[citation needed] when Lém was captured and brought to him, General Loan summarily executed him using his sidearm, a .38 Special Smith & Wesson Model 38 "Bodyguard" revolver,[7] in front of AP photographer Eddie Adams and NBC News television cameraman Võ Sửu. The photograph and footage were broadcast worldwide, galvanizing the anti-war movement.

The photo won Adams the 1969 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography, though he later regretted its effect. The image became an anti-war icon. Concerning Loan and his famous photograph, Adams wrote in Time:

The general killed the Viet Cong; I killed the general with my camera. Still photographs are the most powerful weapon in the world. People believe them, but photographs do lie, even without manipulation. They are only half-truths. What the photograph didn't say was, "What would you do if you were the general at that time and place on that hot day, and you caught the so-called bad guy after he blew away one, two or three American soldiers?"[8]

Adams later apologized in person to General Nguyễn and his family for the damage it did to his reputation. When Loan died of cancer in Virginia, Adams praised him: "The guy was a hero. America should be crying. I just hate to see him go this way, without people knowing anything about him."[9][10]

Click to read the full article:




Sep 19, 2017

The Vietnam War




The Vietnam War, the 18-hour documentary series by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, is getting priority treatment by PBS, which is making it available often and anywhere, and in several languages. Beginning with the premiere on September 17, the ten-episode series will broadcast on PBS stations Sunday through Thursday, through September 28. Each episode will air twice each evening, at 8pm and 9:30pm, with early morning repeats as well. Two weekends of daytime marathon broadcasts start Saturday, September 23.

For more Vietnam-related content and new programs like American Medevac and Legacies of War, see our Vietnam page.


STREAMING SCHEDULE

Beginning Sunday, September 17 at 8pm, the first five episodes will be released. All will stream on the web(desktop or mobile) and THIRTEEN Explore and PBS apps for smartphones, tablets, Apple TV, Roku and Amazon Fire TV. Viewers can choose from four streaming options: English (edited for TV), English (not edited for TV; adult language), Spanish-language, and a Vietnamese version with subtitles. The last five episodes will be available to stream starting Sunday, September 24.
THIRTEEN station members can view all 10-episodes of the film through the member benefit THIRTEEN Passport, beginning Sunday, September 17, through December 31, 2017.


BROADCAST SCHEDULE (PRIMETIME)

Episode One – Déjà Vu (1858-1961) 
Premieres Sunday, September 17, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm Tuesday, October 3 at 9pm
France first attacked the city of Danang in 1858 and by 1887 Vietnam was part of its colony called Indochina. In 1954 after a long and brutal war, Vietnamese revolutionaries led by Ho Chi Minh, French-educated and a Communist, end nearly a century of French occupation. With the Cold War intensifying, Vietnam is divided in two at Geneva. Communists in the north aim to reunify the country, while America supports Ngo Dinh Diem’s untested regime in the south.
Episode Two – Riding the Tiger (1961-1963)
Premieres Monday, September 18, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm Tuesday, October 3 at 10:30pm
As a communist insurgency gains strength, President John F. Kennedy wrestles with American involvement in South Vietnam. To protest the Diem regime’s persecution of Buddhists, the 73-year-old monk Thich Quang Duc sets himself on fire at a major traffic intersection in Saigon on June 11, 1963. The monk’s self-immolation makes news around the world in photographs and television footage.
Episode Three – The River Styx (January 1964–December 1965)
Premieres Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm Tuesday, October 10 at 9pm
With South Vietnam near collapse, President Lyndon B. Johnson begins bombing the North and sends US troops to the South.
Episode Four – Resolve (January 1966–June 1967)
Premieres Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm
Tuesday, October 17 at 9pm
US soldiers discover Vietnam is unlike their fathers’ war, while the antiwar movement grows.
Episode Five – This Is What We Do (July 1967–December 1967)
Premieres Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm
Tuesday, October 24 at 9pm
This episode hones in on six months of the Vietnam War. President Johnson escalates the war while promising the public that victory is in sight.
Episode Six – Things Fall Apart (January 1968–July 1968)
Premieres Sunday, September 24, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm
Tuesday, October 31 at 9pm
This episode covers seven months of the Vietnam War era. Shaken by the Tet Offensive, assassinations and unrest, America seems to be coming apart.
Episode Seven – The Veneer of Civilization (June 1968–May 1969)
Premieres Monday, September 25, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm
Tuesday, November 1 at 9pm
After chaos roils the Democratic Convention, Richard Nixon, promising peace, narrowly wins the presidency.
Episode Eight – The History of the World (April 1969–May 1970)
Premieres Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm
Tuesday, November 14 at 9pm
President Nixon withdraws troops but when he sends forces into Cambodia the antiwar movement reignites.
Episode Nine – A Disrespectful Loyalty (May 1970–March 1973)
Premieres Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm
Tuesday, November 21 at 9pm
South Vietnam fights on its own as President Nixon and Henry Kissinger find a way out for America. The POWs return.
Episode Ten – The Weight of Memory (March 1973–Onward)
Premieres Thursday, September 28, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Repeats at 9:30pm
Tuesday, November 28 at 9pm
Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, falls in 1975 and the war ends. Americans and Vietnamese from all sides search for reconciliation.

MARATHON WEEKEND BROADCASTS

The Vietnam War series will also have weekend broadcasts. Episodes one through five will be broadcast in two blocks on Saturday and Sunday, starting September 23; episodes six through 10, the finale, will be broadcast in two blocks the following weekend, starting Saturday, September 30.

Saturday, September 23 and Sunday September 24

See episode descriptions, above.
Episode One – Déjà Vu (1858-1961) 
Premieres Saturday, September 23, 2017 at 1:00 p.m.
Episode Two – Riding the Tiger (1961-1963)
Premieres Saturday, September 23, 2017 at 2:30 p.m.
Episode Three – The River Styx (January 1964–December 1965)
Premieres Saturday, September 23, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.
Episode Four – Resolve (January 1966–June 1967)
Premieres Sunday, September 24, 2017 at 1:00 p.m.
Episode Five – This Is What We Do (July 1967–December 1967)
Premieres Sunday, September 24, 2017 at 3:00 p.m.

Saturday, September 30 and Sunday, October 1

See episode descriptions, above.
Episode Six – Things Fall Apart (January 1968–July 1968)
Saturday, September 30, 2017 at 12:30 p.m.
Episode Seven – The Veneer of Civilization (June 1968–May 1969)
Saturday, September 30, 2017 at 2:00 p.m.
Episode Eight – The History of the World (April 1969–May 1970)
Saturday, September 30, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.
Episode Nine – A Disrespectful Loyalty (May 1970–March 1973)
Sunday, October 1, 2017 at 1:00 p.m.
Episode Ten – The Weight of Memory (March 1973–Onward)
Sunday, October 1, 2017 at 3:00 p.m.

Sep 17, 2017

National Debt Continues to Grow






Our National Debt continues to grow. Proposed additional spending with tax cuts will worsen the debt.

Deficit spending is appropriate in the depths of a major recession or to support a war. But when the economy is doing well we should ensure that our revenues match or exceed our expenditures.





https://tradingeconomics.com/united-states/government-debt-to-gdp

http://zfacts.com/p/318.html

https://www.cbpp.org/research/the-long-term-fiscal-outlook-is-bleak



Sep 16, 2017

Economic Growth






http://www.city-data.com/forum/history/2515589-history-overall-amount-wealth-america-1776-a.html

Sep 9, 2017

Hurricane Coming


Bummer!  Hurricane Irma is now projected to hit Fort Myers, Sarasota, and Tampa. It is a very major hurricane.  We have done everything we can to get ready and now we must ride it out. No fun.

I was in a Typhoon in 1970 in Vietnam. Actually it was downgraded but we were on Hill 327, about 1,000 feet above sea level, and it ripped our base apart. 



My hootch above after the big winds. From a letter I wrote home:



"A typhoon ripped apart our Hill in October 1970. Most of the buildings and much of our equipment was destroyed. We hid out in bunkers and metal vans during the typhoon. Most of the valley below was flooded. The NVA who had been able to hide in below ground tunnels had to come out to high ground and they were attacked by Korean Marines on the high ground."

We hid out in a radio van during the storm.  Of course we were young and invulnerable, so we kept the door partially open looking at out as the storm increased.  Then WHAM!!. the roof of the building blew off and away into the win. Pretty neat.

The winds destroyed every building. Of course they were simple sea huts, made out of plywood and 2 by 4s. Not for high winds.

We gave up on the Hill after that, and moved our unit down to flat ground below.  But we kept security and our air control radios on the Hill. It was a long commute up the Hill every day so I just moved into a ruined hootch and lived there.  Half of it was gone and it was laying on a steep angle, but it had a great view.


I will let you know how we do in the upcoming fun Hurricane.


My hootch - 1971.  They just don't build hootches the way they used to:

Hurricane Advice

Run from Water, Hide From Wind


When in Danger
When in Doubt
Run in Circles
Scream and Shout






We wore our helmets and flack jackets in Vietnam for the big storm.  We have helmets but no flack jackets for this one




We are ready, with our motorcycle helmets and air mattresses.